Concrete Detail

Erika Hayes, Author – Write like a reader, read like a writer and edit like a beast!

Writer's-Brain-Workout---He-said-she-said-2Let’s take a look at arguments.  There need to be different points of view on topics or this world would be boring.  I mean that is how we learn and grow, right.  In college, maybe even high school when you were assigned to write a persuasive paper didn’t you learn it is good to present both sides and then debunk one of them?  Yeah, well that is a great way to find conflict in your fiction.  When you have a character that holds a firm belief and they are faced with defending that belief, guess what that brings to the table?  Yes, conflict.  All good stories will have some kind of conflict. When you are working out today in the gym of the writer’s brain, take a look at an argument that may appear in your story then write both sides of it.  Look at it from the other guy’s side and see if your character can change because of that argument.  This is a great way to develop character arc in your stories.  Give it a try!

My sample is below:

Writer’s Brain Workout – He Said, She Said 

“Steve, you can’t really think it is right to send a kid to prison for the next fifty years.” Jamela shook her head.

“I do.”

“He was defending himself.”

“That’s his story, but this kid has a rap sheet longer than Fifth street.”

“He’s thirteen.”

“He killed a man.”

“It was an accident.  Did you see him?  He’s no hardened criminal… ”

“Street kid or not, he killed that man. The law’s the law. If it was self-defense then it will come out in court.  I am recommending he be tried as an adult.”

 

Second Outcome: 

“Steve, you can’t really think it is right to send a kid to prison for the next fifty years.” Jamela shook her head.

“I do.”

“He was defending himself.”

“That’s his story, but this kid has a rap sheet longer than Fifth street. He killed a man.  What about justice for that man, his family.”

” He was scared, you saw him,” She lifted the green folder and flipped through the documents,   “All these charges are misdemeanors, shoplifting, stole food from a vendor on the street. It was survival he’s a street kid, that’s no reason to send him to prison for fifty years.  He’s thirteen.”

Leaning forward and took the file from her, “Let me see this.”

“I’m telling you he was defending himself.”

Rubbing his temples, “Jamela, I know you have a soft spot for these street kids but…”

“Look, Steve, fifty years will get him out in twenty, maybe fifteen.  He’s not a hardened criminal now, but if we do this he will come out one.”

“True, but someone needs to pay for this, the law is the law.”

Hope rose in her chest, “Let’s try him as a kid, put him in a rehab facility.  Give the kid a chance.”

Leaning back, “Okay, look I will recommend the kid doesn’t get adult sentencing, but he needs to go to juvie for a while.”

“I’ll take it. Thanks, Steve.”

He tossed the file back at her, “It may not fly, but I will see what I can do.”

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